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Woodstock | How to Drop an Egg From a 2 Storey Building Without Cracking it.
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How to Drop an Egg From a 2 Storey Building Without Cracking it.

19 Nov How to Drop an Egg From a 2 Storey Building Without Cracking it.

In their science class, Grade 9 students were challenged by their teacher Nishtha Daniel to design, build, test and evaluate a “safety device” that would protect a raw egg from cracking, when dropped from any height to describe a collision in terms of changing momentum, impulse, impact force and impact time. 

 

“Students worked in group of twos and built their safety device using just a styrofoam cup, 1 sheet of newspaper, tape, 5 straws, and 4 balloons in twenty minutes. Out of eleven groups, 4 groups’ safety device landed safely from the height of thirty-five feet. This was an interdisciplinary project involving science, engineering and art.” -Nishta Daniel

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Our design was very successful and survived the top level of the Quad. We are happy we chose that design. We tried to base it off of one of the Apollo moon landers. We learnt that appearance isn’t as important as the concept. -Ved and Chowang

Parachute design

Parachute design

In grade 9 Science, the concept of impact time’s relation with impact force was explored through a project of building a safety device for an egg using just a styrofoam cup, a newspaper, tape, straws, and balloons. Students were meant to drop the device with the egg from different levels, and surprisingly quite a few groups of students’ device made it through to level three of Quad School Music building. More impact time would result in less impact force. We used balloons at the base of the cup that held the egg in order to increase the impact time and attached the cup to a newspaper “parachute” in order to decrease the speed. Changes such as adding a stable base of balloons and increasing the newspaper cushioning in the cup would have concluded in a safer egg lading. Nevertheless, it was a fun project that was thoroughly enjoyed. -Khushi and Diya

The looking good stage

The looking good stage

Unique contraptions in the making

Unique contraptions in the making

A styrofoam cup, one sheet of newspaper, tape, five straws, and four balloons in twenty minutes.

A styrofoam cup, one sheet of newspaper, tape, five straws, and four balloons and twenty minutes.

We decided to design our egg safety device with the help of balloons. We used the balloons on the bottom of the cup so that it would slow down the journey to the floor which would result in less impact force. We could have put the balloons on the sides of the cup instead of using them at the bottom. I learnt that putting balloons at the bottom of the cup actually makes it come down faster and makes it heavier. We enjoyed this activity. -Tarini

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Andrew Francis(Middle Years teacher)judging

Andrew Francis(Middle Years teacher)judging

 Science Teachers Nishtha Daniel and Todd Schumacher

Science Teachers Nishtha Daniel and Todd Schumacher

An egg is what sits in the passenger’ seat. It has to be protected by all means. Hence we had thought of a collision safety device for it. We learnt that the defining factor of the experiment was the impact time. If the device had more time to impact, the impact force would have been much weaker on the egg. This experiment was a good way to test how impact time and impact force can affect an object in motion. – Shawn and Sangi

Rapt audience

Young audience enjoying the flying eggs display

The egg, a delicate object, should not be thrown off a two-storey building on a mountain, but if it is to be thrown, then it shall always be protected by a vehicle to carry it down in safety. The device created by us consisted of a balloon, a styrofoam cup and some straws. The egg itself was made to sit in the cup with padding made out of crumpled newspaper strips and attached to a balloon with straws. The padding proved to of great help, as it cushioned the fall and prevented the egg from cracking. It survived a few falls, but alas, when it floated down from the two-stories high, the straw attached to the balloon bent over and tore resulting in the balloon float sideways instead of straight downwards. Therefore, the egg cracked a tiny bit, and so with the crack, ended the journey of our glorious egg! We learnt that how just a few pieces of crumpled up paper can save an egg. And that we need to tape our straws properly before starting the activity. – Alisa and Pankhuri

 

1Comment
  • Helen Dobson Arnott
    Posted at 15:33h, 19 November Reply

    Sure enjoyed reading what everyone wrote…..very good reporting! The last comment made me smile. And even if your egg cracks, you still learn something!

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